The Thing that Won’t Go Away

The follow-up with my interventional radiologist/neurosurgeon confirmed the MRA I had in December showed additional development of more blood getting into the neck of my first brain aneurysm – AGAIN. We went through these discussions back in 2015 when that remnant first showed up. I decided to kick the can and watch, wait, and continue to monitor it. After five years, it appears there is more blood now.

The doctor wants me to have another angiogram to get a closer look and determine if we need to take action now. This is not the way I had hoped to start the new year. It may be nothing alarming…or it might be.

I created the graphic below to present, in it’s simplest form, what’s happening. This is the first aneurysm that ruptured in 2006. It’s 11mm or about 1/2” in diameter.

  • There were 16 coils inserted into the aneurysm in 2006.
  • Those coils healed and clotted, preventing blood from getting back into the aneurysm.
  • Five years later, the coils either started to compact, the shape of the aneurysm and neck of the aneurysm changed, or a combination of both occurred, This allowed some blood to get back into the neck of the aneurysm.
  • 4 more coils were inserted (for a total of 20) and a stent was placed across the bottom of the neck in the artery in 2011.
  • In 2015, during annual checkups, it was discovered more blood was starting to get back into the aneurysm again.
  • We decided to “wait and watch” the remnant of blood for future development.
  • Now in 2022, we’re discussing the fact that it appears MORE blood is getting into the aneurysm after six years of stability. This is also a brain aneurysm that has already ruptured once.

During the last 15 years, I have had to endure a couple of “watch and wait” periods for both my aneurysms. There is always a nagging worry that lays there asking those probing questions: Is it growing? Has there been any change? Am I making it worse? Could something I’m doing make it rupture? Is that headache a sign that something is wrong?

Anyone who is living with brain aneurysms knows that worry. Telling me to “Not worry about it” is far easier said than done.

The good news is that I feel fine. I just hope I can stay that way. 🤞

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